fbpx
A White version of the Framing the Hammer logo, including a framed, hand-drawn hammer icon in a hand-drawn frame.

“Democratizing Art” with Bianca Bosker

April 18, 2024
Episode #116
New York Times bestselling author Bianca Bosker
In this episode, Gavin chats with New York Times bestselling author of “Cork Dork,” Bianca Bosker, whose most recent book, “Get the Picture” is a deep dive into various aspects of the visual arts industry.
A photo of author Bianca Bosker, a light skinned woman with straight dark hair, standing in front of her book cover - imposed to look like it is hung on a gallery wall.

“Democratization of American Arts and Culture” means lowering or removing barriers to experiencing, creating, and sharing art. Through this process, ideas are explored, questions asked, humanity exposed, bonds created, and communities are greatly strengthened. Democratizing the arts also helps strengthen American democracy, by strengthening communities, building belonging, and advancing interest in participatory citizenship. This is why Democratizing the Arts is one of the pillars of the 4A Arts mission, and our 2024 issues agenda includes Arts + Democracy. We believe that real investment in American arts, culture, design, and craft can strengthen communities and counter the political polarization currently undermining American democracy. 

A 4A Arts quote icon, showing quotation marks

Art can be a fight against complacency; a choice to live a life that’s more challenging and ultimately more beautiful.

Bianca Bosker is the New York Times bestselling author of “Cork Dork” whose most recent book, “Get the Picture” is a deep dive into various aspects of the visual arts industry. As a child, Bianca was a lover of all things artsy but had grown disillusioned with the snobbery and barriers erected by the art world. Eventually, the realization of her disengagement drove her to immerse herself in various aspects of the art world for better understanding. Through her research for Get the Picture, she worked as a gallerist, artist assistant, and museum guard. 

At the top of our conversation, Bianca references Salvador Dali’s “Lobster Telephone” as an artwork that profoundly affected and inspired her.  

A piece by Salvador Dali in which an old fashioned rotary dial telephone has a lobster on the handset.

“Lobster Telephone” Salvador Dali (1904-1989) Tate Museum, London

We hope you enjoy this conversation about Bianca’s fascinating dive into the art industrial complex rabbit hole.

SUPPORT THE MOVEMENT

Support 4A Arts’ Mission by making a contribution

SUPPORT THE MOVEMENT

Support 4A Arts’ Mission by making a contribution

You May Also Like:

A New Approach to Arts Advocacy

Here at 4A Arts, we count ourselves very lucky to be part of a vast ecosystem of arts, culture, design, and craft; an ecosystem that includes artists, teachers, and advocates across the country. But we also know that not everyone shares our values. After decades of...

Americans: Join the Fight for Arts, Culture, Design & Craft

We are excited to share our new video encapsulating our vision for American arts, culture, design, and craft.  Here at 4A Arts, we know that in order to create an arts ecosystem that thrives instead of merely survives, we will have to develop and initiate new...

Arts Advocacy in the Age of AI, Part 2: A Call for Self Reflection

This is the second in a series about the role of arts advocacy in the age of artificial intelligence. To read the first part, head over here.In recent years, we in the arts advocacy space have spent immense amounts of time and resources defending the importance of the...

Skip to content